Evolution Racerwerks (ER) Front End Widebody Kit

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$1,995.00 $1,795.50
(You save $199.50)
SKU:
BM-AERO001
Weight:
32.00 LBS
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Calculated at checkout
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Part Compatible With The Following:

Product Description

FE (Front End) Widebody Kit (1 Series)
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We’re proud to introduce our new Front End (FE) Widebody Kit for the 2008+ BMW 1 Series Coupe (135i and 128i). The aggressive wide stance yet subtle lines will definitely turn heads!  It's functional purpose will increase the handling potential of your car exponentially.  This is how the 1 series should have came from the factory!

Ease of Installation (1 Easy, 5 Hard) 2

Key Features:

1) Developed directly through our Time Attack (Time Trials) racing program.

2) Completely bolt on kit.  No body modifications required.  Only basic hand tools required for installation.

3) 100% reversible.  You can remove the wide body kit and reinstall factory body panels.

4) Fits all 1 Series coupes (135i & 128i)

5) Fenders are 2.5" wider than factory fenders giving you a total of 5" of increased track (width).  Easily accommodates a 10" wide wheel (10.5" max).

6) 5 piece kit (front bumper, 2x fenders, 2x side skirts).

7) Available in economic fiberglass (FRP), traditional wet carbon fiber and ultra lightweight dry vacuum carbon fiber.

8) Compression type plug molds used in production.  Better fitment than traditional molds.  Smooth finish on exterior as well as interior faces of each part.

9) Includes all hardware needed for installation.

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Evolution Racewerks FE Widebody Kit is a direct development from their 135i Time Attack Race Program. They found out very early in testing and development of the 135i that it had an understeer problem at the limit.  This was odd considering that the car is RWD which typically exhibits an oversteer characteristic.  Even with suspension upgrades like springs/shocks and sway bar upgrades, the problem still persisted.  After further inspection and testing, found the main problem lies in traction, namely front wheel traction.  The 1 series, being small and lightweight compared to other BMW series like a 3 series make it an ideal choice as a track car.  However, one of the compromises of being smaller is that it features a smaller track (width).  The front track on the 135i is 58.4" versus the 335's 59.1".  The 135i's small chassis  and subsequent short track (width) along with small front fenders dictated BMW to use a narrow 7.5" front wheel and tiny 215/40/18.  On the rears however, a 8.5" wheel and 245/35/18 tires were used.  A wider wheel/tire will offer more contact patch with the ground thus offering more traction.  With the front tires being so small compared to the rears, the rear end would have more traction than the front, promoting an understeer condition.  Also, for the weight and power of the car, the front 215/40/18 tires are far too undersized.  In hard turns, the front tires would lose traction at the limit.  This caused the front end to slide towards the outside of the turn, in effect causing an understeer condition.  Even though the rear end would rotate in the corner like a RWD car should, with the front end understeering, the car would not rotate and "pushes" to the outside of the corner instead of rotating into the turn.

Our FE Widebody Kit is a direct development from our 135i Time Attack Race Program.  We found out very early in testing and development of the 135i that it had an understeer problem at the limit.  This was odd considering that the car is RWD which typically exhibits an oversteer characteristic.  Even with suspension upgrades like springs/shocks and sway bar upgrades, the problem still persisted.  After further inspection and testing, we found out that the main problem lies in traction, namely front wheel traction.  The 1 series, being small and lightweight compared to other BMW series like a 3 series make it an ideal choice as a track car.  However, one of the compromises of being smaller is that it features a smaller track (width).  The front track on the 135i is 58.4" versus the 335's 59.1".  The 135i's small chassis  and subsequent short track (width) along with small front fenders dictated BMW to use a narrow 7.5" front wheel and tiny 215/40/18.  On the rears however, a 8.5" wheel and 245/35/18 tires were used.  A wider wheel/tire will offer more contact patch with the ground thus offering more traction.  With the front tires being so small compared to the rears, the rear end would have more traction than the front, promoting an understeer condition.  Also, for the weight and power of the car, the front 215/40/18 tires are far too undersized.  In hard turns, the front tires would lose traction at the limit.  This caused the front end to slide towards the outside of the turn, in effect causing an understeer condition.  Even though the rear end would rotate in the corner like a RWD car should, with the front end understeering, the car would not rotate and "pushes" to the outside of the corner instead of rotating into the turn.

Many will ask, why was the rear quarter panels not widened?  The main reason, function over form.  The rear wide body was not needed.  We were able to fit the right size wheel and tire we wanted in the rear of the car without modification. Now, the style these days seems to be with widebody all around and staggered big wheels in the rear, but this actual hurts performance in this particular case. With a widebody rear end, you would either run a wider wheel/tire combo which would increase rear traction, again putting us back to the original problem of having too much rear traction versus the front.  If not widen the rear wheels but kept the same 10" wheel, the rear track (width) of the rear wheels would be increased so that it sits at the edge of the widened rear quarter panel.  With a wider track, again you would increase rear traction, falling back to original problem we were trying to fix.  At the current moment, the car handles beautifully.  If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Changing either the rear tire size or increasing the track (width) would invoke understeer.  At the moment with over 400hp, we have enough rear traction to handle the power.  In the future, the car will make considerably more power and therefore a need to increase rear traction.  When that time comes, the rear wide body would be made available.

Another thing considered was installation.  The FE Widebody Kit is 100% bolt on.  The FE Widebody Kit is 5 pieces and replaces the front bumper cover, front 2 fenders, and 2 side skirts.  All of which is held in place by bolts or brackets.  It can be installed with basic hand tools at home.  You do not require a body shop to install this kit.  It does not require modification to the chassis and therefore 100% reversible.  In a rear widebody kit, this is not possible.  The rear quarter panel on the 135i is welded to the chassis and therefore is not removeable.  It would require a body shop to cut the rear quarter panel's wheel well and weld it back together.  The body shop would then need to mold the widebody to the existing rear quarter panel and then repaint.  This procress would cost thousands of dollars at the body shop just for installation!  All of which is not reversible as the actual chassis has been modified and cut.  With our FE Widebody Kit, you can install easily at home and uninstall it if you need to and make your car PERFORM like a beast.

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Many will ask, why was the rear quarter panels not widened?  The main reason, function over form.  The rear wide body was not needed.  We were able to fit the right size wheel and tire we wanted in the rear of the car without modification. Now, the style these days seems to be with widebody all around and staggered big wheels in the rear, but this actual hurts performance in this particular case. With a widebody rear end, you would either run a wider wheel/tire combo which would increase rear traction, again putting us back to the original problem of having too much rear traction versus the front.  If not widen the rear wheels but kept the same 10" wheel, the rear track (width) of the rear wheels would be increased so that it sits at the edge of the widened rear quarter panel.  With a wider track, again you would increase rear traction, falling back to original problem we were trying to fix.  At the current moment, the car handles beautifully.  If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Changing either the rear tire size or increasing the track (width) would invoke understeer.  At the moment with over 400hp, we have enough rear traction to handle the power.  In the future, the car will make considerably more power and therefore a need to increase rear traction.  When that time comes, the rear wide body would be made available.

Another thing considered was installation.  The FE Widebody Kit is 100% bolt on.  The FE Widebody Kit is 5 pieces and replaces the front bumper cover, front 2 fenders, and 2 side skirts.  All of which is held in place by bolts or brackets.  It can be installed with basic hand tools at home.  You do not require a body shop to install this kit.  It does not require modification to the chassis and therefore 100% reversible.  In a rear widebody kit, this is not possible.  The rear quarter panel on the 135i is welded to the chassis and therefore is not removeable.  It would require a body shop to cut the rear quarter panel's wheel well and weld it back together.  The body shop would then need to mold the widebody to the existing rear quarter panel and then repaint.  This procress would cost thousands of dollars at the body shop just for installation!  All of which is not reversible as the actual chassis has been modified and cut.  With our FE Widebody Kit, you can install easily at home and uninstall it if you need to and make your car PERFORM like a beast.

The FE Widebody Kit is available in 3 different composites.  The Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic (FRP) is the most economical of all the versions.  It has a gel coated and then preprimered for paint.  Next up is the wet carbon fiber which traditionally is the process which all carbon fiber hoods and body kits are built.  It is produced the same way as FRP except with carbon fiber sheets instead of fiberglass sheets.  It is slightly lighter than the FRP.  It comes gloss clear coated to show off the exposed carbon fiber weaves.  Last, is our dry vacuum carbon fiber, which is lighter and stronger than the traditional wet carbon fiber.  Resin is used to glue the layers of composite together and is heavy and brittle.  The part is put into vacuum which pulls all the excess resin from the part.  This allows the bare minimum of resin needed, make thing part super lightweight and strong.  Below are the weight of all the composite parts versus the prototype part (which is modified OEM parts).

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  OEM Prototype Fiberglass Carbon Fiber (wet) Carbon Fiber (dry vacuum)
Front Bumper 17 lbs / 7.7 kgs 14 lbs / 6.4 kgs 12 lbs / 5.5 kgs 7 lbs / 3.2 kgs
Front Fenders (x2) 9 lbs / 4.1 kgs 4 lbs / 1.8 kgs 3 lbs / 1.4 kgs 2 lbs / 0.9 kgs
Side Skirt (x2) 7 lbs / 3.2 kgs 5 lbs / 2.3 kgs 3 lbs / 1.4 kgs 2 lbs / 0.9 kgs
Total 49 lbs / 22.3 kgs 32 lbs / 14.5 kgs 24 lbs / 13.6 kgs

17 lbs / 7.7 kgs



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